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Henry VIII: the 'gadget master'

Royal Armouries

‘Holy Water Sprinkler’ - Combination Mace and Gun, early 1500s.  Give your enemy a nasty surprise! This certainly doesn’t sprinkle water, holy or not. But it may have shed a drop or two of blood. This combination weapon not only has some fearsome spikes but also conceals three guns (for the Tudor James Bond).   This weapon is fitted with three gun barrels around the top spike of the mace. They would have been fired using a hand-held match cord. In the 1547 inventory of Henry s property, this type of weapon was called a holy water sprinkler , on the basis that it bore a slight resemblance to the object used by priests to sprinkle holy water at church. 'Holy Water Sprinkler' - Combination Mace and Gun, early 1500s
This certainly doesn't sprinkle water, holy or not, but it may have shed a drop or two of blood. This combination weapon not only has some fearsome spikes but also conceals three guns.
This weapon is fitted with three gun barrels around the top spike of the mace. They would have been fired using a hand-held match cord. In the 1547 inventory of Henry's property, this type of weapon was called a holy water sprinkler, on the basis that it bore a slight resemblance to the object used by priests to sprinkle holy water at church

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Fertility and pins in the codpiece
[info]sadman123456 wrote:
Thursday, 2 April 2009 at 07:53 am (UTC)
..In Victorian times young women would stick pins into the lining of the codpiece in the hope of increasing their fertility....." so the poor bugger donning the armour did not know there were a few pins strategically placed by his lady in waiting that would pierce his appendage or his bollocks ? Not exactly a good way to start a family was it?
Re: Fertility and pins in the codpiece
[info]dnmurphy wrote:
Wednesday, 4 November 2009 at 12:15 pm (UTC)
Did they have codpieces in Victorian England? I always associate that item of clothing with the Tudors and middle ages.
Not practical
[info]sadman123456 wrote:
Thursday, 2 April 2009 at 07:58 am (UTC)
This gauntlet does not seem practical at all. Besides the 90 lbs the poor fool would have to contend with he could hardly hold weapons which appear to have required they be thrust into the hole by the hand. A lightly armed opponent could take this overironed foll down in a second.
Re: Not practical
[info]johnjjonz wrote:
Thursday, 2 April 2009 at 12:33 pm (UTC)
The gauntlets are articulated, the plates move over each other so that the wearer can move his fingers. And these guys trained to fight in this gear, they were warriors by profession. I hear that Henry VIII was a real good athlete when he was young also.
Sure does protect one's hand
[info]pontiacprince wrote:
Wednesday, 4 November 2009 at 12:52 pm (UTC)
Problem is that HRH would have been unable to 'ply' with his codpiece given the amount of armour on the hand.....

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